FEATURED BY LAWYERIST – HOW TO PROMOTE A UNIQUE VALUE PROPOSITION TO YOUR CLIENTS

I’m excited that my article How to Promote a Unique Value Proposition to Your Clients was featured by Lawyerist.com. 

In theory, every business should promote a unique value proposition to its targeted customers. Harvard Business School defines “unique value proposition” as “the kind of value a company will create for its customers.”

Does the concept hold for law firms? In my view, the answer is obvious: lawyers may need unique marketing strategies to market to clients, but they can follow models long proven in other industries. A law firm can (and should) market itself just like other businesses.

Before you can market your law firm, you need to learn to… Read the rest of the article at

FEATURED BY LAWZAM – USING CLIENT LEAD DATA TO DEVELOP NEW LEGAL BUSINESS

My article Using Client Lead Data to Develop New Legal Business was recently featured by Lawzam.

The point of your law firm’s marketing strategy is to drive new business. It’s why your legal practice commits dollars to websites, social media advertising, digital display ads, and more. You wouldn’t go to trial without doing research on existing case law. Don’t throw money into marketing schemes without first considering the data.

Who is your market?

This is the most important question to consider when marketing your legal practice. It is a waste of time, energy, and budget to chase after page views, likes, and clicks from people who are not in your target audience. If you are getting a lead every day from people in jail looking for a criminal defense attorney, but you practice real estate law, then your lead generation dollars are being wasted.

You don’t just need leads. You need leads for potential clients.

Read the rest of the article by clicking here.

FEATURED ON CONFESSIONS OF A MARKETER PODCAST – MARKETERS: TIME TO USE YOUR NOGGIN

I’m really excited to announce I was recently on Mark Reed-Edward’s podcast “Confessions of a Marketer”.

He split our talk into two sessions, the first of which is available right now — Marketers: Time to Use Your Noggin.

You can listen to the podcast episode by clicking here.

Featured on Confessions of a Marketer Podcast – Marketers: Time to Use Your Noggin

I’m really excited to announce I was recently on Mark Reed-Edward’s podcast “Confessions of a Marketer”.
He split our talk into two sessions, the first of which is available right now — Marketers: Time to Use Your Noggin.
You can listen to the podcast episode by clicking here.

Featured by Lawzam – Using Client Lead Data to Develop New Legal Business

My article Using Client Lead Data to Develop New Legal Business was recently featured by Lawzam.
The point of your law firm’s marketing strategy is to drive new business. It’s why your legal practice commits dollars to websites, social media advertising, digital display ads, and more. You wouldn’t go to trial without doing research on existing case law. Don’t throw money into marketing schemes without first considering the data.

Who is your market?

This is the most important question to consider when marketing your legal practice. It is a waste of time, energy, and budget to chase after page views, likes, and clicks from people who are not in your target audience. If you are getting a lead every day from people in jail looking for a criminal defense attorney, but you practice real estate law, then your lead generation dollars are being wasted.
You don’t just need leads. You need leads for potential clients.
Read the rest of the article by clicking here.

Featured by Clio – 4 Ways to Use CTAs to Get More Legal Clients

My article 4 Ways to Use CTAs to Get More Legal Clients was recently featured by Clio.

A call to action (CTA) is a statement designed to spur the reader to action. The most common call to action example is “Buy Now!”, but there are an infinite number of messages and ways to influence your style and tone in a way that best caters to your audience.

One thing is certain for all CTAs, however, and that’s the fact that they always contain an action word—usually in the form of a command. On websites it’s common to see call to actions with the words “follow,” “sign up,” “register,” “subscribe,” “buy,” “download,” “share,” and “click here.” These words urge the website user to…

Read the rest of the article by clicking here.

Featured by Attorney at Work – Five Fresh Marketing Ideas for 2019

I’m excited that my article Five Fresh Marketing Ideas for 2019 was featured by Attorney At Work.
Make 2019 your law practice’s best year yet with a mix of online and offline marketing tactics. Don’t be afraid to try something new or different — and don’t automatically dismiss old-school tactics. Here are five ideas to get your wheels turning.

1. Spread Your Brand Around
Most law firms have branded merchandise  — pens, mouse pads, travel mugs. You may be ordering these giveaways for an industry trade show, but what happens to the extra swag when the show ends? Next year put… Read the rest of the article by clicking here.

Featured by Lawyerist – How to Promote a Unique Value Proposition to Your Clients

I’m excited that my article How to Promote a Unique Value Proposition to Your Clients was featured by Lawyerist.com. 
In theory, every business should promote a unique value proposition to its targeted customers. Harvard Business School defines “unique value proposition” as “the kind of value a company will create for its customers.”

Does the concept hold for law firms? In my view, the answer is obvious: lawyers may need unique marketing strategies to market to clients, but they can follow models long proven in other industries. A law firm can (and should) market itself just like other businesses.

Before you can market your law firm, you need to learn to…
Read the rest of the article at:

https://lawyerist.com/promote-unique-value-proposition/#

Why Lawyers Should Use WordPress Instead of Squarespace for Law Firm Websites

Why Lawyers Should Use WordPress Instead of Squarespace for Law Firm Websites
Squarespace and WordPress are currently the two most popular services for law firms looking to build or redesign their website. But does either have the edge over the other?

The comparison is a bit difficult to make. Squarespace is a straightforward website building service, while WordPress is an open-source platform for all types of web content, meaning they fall in slightly different categories. Still, these are the two primary services people choose between for their web design projects, which makes it essential to understand the advantages and disadvantages of each.
While Squarespace can seem like an attractive choice for firms, lawyers who need flexibility and scalability should choose WordPress.
In the interest of full disclosure, it’s worth pointing out that Karin builds WordPress websites. That said, we definitely agree that WordPress is almost always the better option for law firm websites. —Ed.

Ease of Use

Squarespace’s most recent version is significantly easier to use than the previous editions. It has a clean, uncomplicated interface. Users do not need to know how to code. This is Squarespace’s primary advantage: everything you need to design a custom website and publish new posts and pages is all in one place, with no real technical expertise necessary.
WordPress has a slightly larger learning curve, as it is more of an overall CMS (content management system) than a simple site-building tool. If you already have some experience in building websites, WordPress is an excellent option.

In general, Squarespace is easier to use at first for beginners, but it has some significant caps on its capabilities. WordPress seems slightly more difficult at first, but does not have anywhere near the same limits in place, and still has plenty of beginner-friendly theme and plugin options. In the long run, WordPress is the better option for ease of use for any law firms that want anything beyond the most basic website available.

Features

Squarespace has plenty of features, including built-in apps and widgets. It has most of the tools any law firm needs to build a website, such as blogging functionality, ability to import and export content, connectivity with social media, and the ability to have multiple users with different levels of access.
WordPress is also extremely flexible and has more plugins and widgets, as well as SEO packs and commenting systems.
WordPress is much more scalable, which is more important for more complex websites or websites with higher demands for unique features. This makes WordPress the better option for law firms looking for a variety of high-quality features for their websites.

Design Options

Squarespace has around 60 templates for websites and 9 for online stores, each of which automatically includes a mobile version.
WordPress has many free and paid themes—estimated at more than 10,000 right now. Some of these designs are responsive; some are not. It can take some time to learn how to customize these themes, and sometimes that customization requires a basic understanding of HTML, CSS, and PHP.
But if you are working with a developer, your options are nearly unlimited with WordPress. It allows for complete control and customization (provided you have the knowledge to edit CSS and PHP), so your website is entirely editable, where with Squarespace you are constrained to their templates.

For design options, there is no comparison. WordPress has a much greater variety, and while the quality can vary, it is quite easy to find a sizable amount of high-quality themes for free or for a relatively low price.

Support

Squarespace has plenty of support options, including live chat, email support, and support through its Community Forum.
WordPress does not have an email or phone number for support, but there are countless video tutorials, forums and additional online resources dedicated to helping WordPress users with their websites. The open source nature of the site has built up a lot of communities that are centered on tinkering with WordPress’s functionality and features, meaning you have plenty of potential helpers to guide you through your digital innovation.

Portability

If you are unhappy with either platform, it’s essential to be able to move your site to a different platform with relative ease and without losing data or traffic. WordPress excels at this function, having built-in tools that allow you to export easily, and then import, your data into a different WordPress install or another platform.
Squarespace is also limited here, only allowing you to export certain features into an XML file, which may not be compatible with your new platform. You will not be able to export your text, audio, video blocks, or album pages, so you could potentially lose a lot of content if you decide to move your site from Squarespace.

Cost

Squarespace starts around $10/month for very limited features. You are required to use Squarespace as your host, which can be problematic when it comes to integrating other services such as payment gateways, email opt-in systems, or client management software.
WordPress is open source and free. You will need to purchase hosting and would be good to get a WordPress-managed hosting account. That cost varies, but this will allow you to be in control of where your site is hosted so you can arrange for a plan that supports all the features your firm needs.
Ultimately, most law firms are better served by using WordPress, which offers more freedom, is more extensible and portable, has significantly more design options, and more features.
Why Lawyers Should Use WordPress Instead of Squarespace for Law Firm Websites was originally published on Lawyerist.com.

Calls to Action on Law Firm Websites: the Great and the Ineffective

If the content on your law firm website serves to showcase your law firm’s skill, experience and ability to solve problems, it is your call to action that ultimately prompts potential clients to pick up the phone or fill out a contact form.

Your call to action should be concise, simple and action-oriented. It should make your visitors want to become clients. Here are some of the great (and not-so-great) calls to action out there.

Best Practices in Calls to Action

In our world of short attention spans, most of your visitors will spend fewer than 15 seconds on your website before deciding to take action or move on.
To that end, a CTA should be eye-catching, punchy and do everything possible to encourage action on the part of your visitor as quickly as possible. Your visitors should know what they’ll get out of contacting you, and the CTA should be easy to find—without being obnoxious.

As I compiled this list of the best law firm CTAs, I started by looking through the best law firm websites. Surprisingly, many of these sites did not contain clear, effective CTAs.

Great Examples of Effective Law Firm Website CTAs

Good CTAs are visually attractive without interfering with the overall aesthetic of the website.

YLaw Group


This family law firm got creative with its CTA—and it really works. With its revolving screens and effective photos, the firm asks visitors to call when “family life isn’t a box of chocolates” or“when change is not a realistic solution.” The play on words strikes a chord with people considering divorce.

Small Law


This is a good CTA, with its fun play on words reflecting the firm’s name, Small Law.

C.A. Goldberg


Use of the phrase “we can help” works very well with this firm’s CTA. It also provides two clear options to the user: to schedule a consultation or donate to a pro-bono case.

Kain and Scott


The idea of “get your life back” is sure to resonate with individuals facing bankruptcy. The firm also does an excellent job of separating the different paths visitors might take depending on their needs.

Ineffective Law Firm Website CTAs

Calls to action should be simple and to the point. Some legal websites go too far and are too complex in their messaging or obscure their CTAs with popups.

Staver Law Group


The popup here makes this CTA ineffective. Visitors are more likely to click away than they are to click “yes” to the intrusive question being asked of them.

Abes Baumann


This CTA page would be great without the pop-up. The firm even apologizes for interrupting the user experience!

Some Great Non-Legal CTAs

Law firm websites can take inspiration from great CTAs on non-legal websites.

Evernote


Digital marketers have long appreciated Evernote’s “Remember Everything” slogan, which the
company uses on its call to action page. It quickly and concisely tells users the value its product offers.

Netflix


Netflix is another well-known brand with a fantastic CTA. The streaming service invites visitors to “see what’s next” and offers them a one-month free trial.

Grey Goose


Rather than an overly promotional marketing message, Grey Goose invites visitors to find a cocktail suited to their unique tastes.

OKCupid


Popular dating website OKCupid makes great use of color contrast in its CTA. The site also makes it easy for a user to get started with the service.
Make sure your website encourages a visitor to take the first step towards becoming your client by having an effective call to action.
Calls to Action on Law Firm Websites: the Great and the Ineffective was originally published on Lawyerist.com.